tel. 314-434-7784

    Nerve Surgery St Louis

    Our vision at Neuropax Clinic is to be a leader in creating a health care delivery platform that works more effectively for patients suffering from chronic pain, peripheral diabetic neuropathy, carpal tunnel, tarsal tunnel, chronic migraines/headaches, cubital tunnel, radial tunnel and other serious complications related to peripheral nerve damage. We fulfill this vision by offering proven, advanced diagnostic and surgical techniques to help patients stop suffering and reclaim their quality of life.

    Neuropax Clinic is also dedicated to bringing relief to our patients through the education of patients and physicians. We advance science and public awareness about the benefits of our surgical procedures and the results of those procedures.

    You Need to See How Peripheral Nerve Issues Lead to Migraines

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    Migraines that are caused by peripheral nerves can be treated with peripheral nerve surgery. The surgery involves freeing the nerve from the surrounding tissue to relieve the irritation. This can alleviate, reduce, or even end the pain of migraines once and for all. Peripheral nerve problems leading to migraines are a problem that can be solved.

    What causes this pain? Just like with any peripheral nerve issue, there can be multiple causes. Some people are born with a proclivity toward migraines through physiology or build, and they develop them naturally.

    Another is lifestyle. It is no coincidence that migraines have increased as we have become more dependent on screens and phones, items that cause our bodies to contort to strange shapes to utilize properly.

    Looking down at a screen all day can cause an impingement of the occipital nerve in the neck that can lead to migraines and pain. All it takes is a bit of pressure on the occipital nerve and you can be debilitated for hours.

    Migraines are a real health problem. They can lead to job loss and loss of quality of life, as they can cause sufferers intense pain and remove their ability to concentrate or work.

    It can make you irritable or short-tempered, with the need to get away and lie in a dark room more important than spending time with your family. Migraines have a cascading effect on the rest of your life, but they can be fixed.

    Repairing a damaged or impinged peripheral nerve can be a lifechanging experience and lead to a better life, and can also be often held as an outpatient surgery with a short recovery time.

    If you suffer from migraines, call the offices of Dr. Robert Hagan at Neuropax Clinic. You can reach them at 314-434-7784 or visit www.neuropaxclinic.com to make an appointment. Don’t live with migraines any linger than you have to.

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    Migraine Surgery Can Help With Migraine Problems

    Migraine Surgery Can Help With Migraine Problems

    Migraines are a scourge. They can ruin your entire life if untreated. A migraine can leave you lying in a dark room or home early from work. Nerve compression surgery for migraines can help.

    There are 180 different defined types of headaches. Headaches are common in the US, with a variety of different causes. Chronic, daily or even continual headaches can be from migraines. There are over 30 million people believed to be suffering from migraines today. While some can be treated with medication and therapy, some require surgery.

    13% or more of migraines are thought to be related to occipital neuralgia. When the Greater occipital nerve is impinged, with tissue causing pressure on the nerve, the symptoms begin. If they remain untreated, it leads to migraine headaches.

    Although the Greater occipital nerve is the most common nerve involved, other nerves can be involved as well. The lesser occipital nerve and dorsal (or least) occipital nerve which are located in the back of the head/scalp. Headaches may originate from the forehead or frontal region as well. The nerves involved in this area include the supra-orbital and zygomatico-temporal nerves.

    When no other underlying diseases or conditions are found, you may be a candidate for a nerve decompression surgery that can reduce or end your migraine headaches.  This is an outpatient surgery with short recovery times. Results are often immediately evident but may take several weeks. Neuropax surgeons can assess if nerve decompression surgery would help to alleviate or significantly reduce your debilitating symptoms.

    If you feel that you may be suffering from migraines, please call the office at Neuropax Clinic at 314-434-7784 to make an appointment. Don’t live in pain another day if you don’t have to. Visit www.neuropaxclinic.com for more information.

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    In St. Louis Do You Have Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    Do You Have Carpal Tunnel Syndrome in St. Louis

    Carpal Tunnel Syndrome is caused by repeated and frequent pressure on the median nerve. This is the nerve that gives feeling and movement to the different part of the hand, and it’s located in the wrist. Carpal Tunnel is common in people that work primarily with their hands, fingers and wrists with repetitive actions. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome warning signs are there to be found.

    If we watch for these early signs, we can keep on top of it. A really early sign is tingling or numbness in the palm, thumb, middle, ring and index fingers. If you start to notice these, you may have inflammation in the tissues of the wrist pressing on the median nerve. This causes the increased pain and numbness in the palm and fingers.

    Also watch for fine finger coordination issues. If you find yourself dropping or carrying things awkwardly, you may have carpal tunnel syndrome. You can also watch for weakened hand grip.

    Severe cases will give you a stiffening, locking or tightening of the hand, wrist, forearm and elbow. This can be so bad that it’s difficult to sleep or concentrate.

    Keep track of loss of strength or even muscle atrophy in the palm and fingers, noticeably in the thumb. If you suddenly can’t open a pickle jar, you could be experiencing the extreme signs of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    If you feel that you may be suffering from Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, please call the office at Neuropax Clinic at 314-434-7784 to make an appointment. Don’t live in pain another day if you don’t have to. Visit www.neuropaxclinic.com for more information.

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    Getting Migraine Surgery in St. Louis

    headache medium

    If you get severe headaches often, you may be suffering from migraines. Migraines are headaches with throbbing pain, usually described as worse on one side of your head or the other. Often debilitating, the migraine can stop you from fulfilling your daily activities and responsibilities. They can also last anywhere from hours to days. Migraine sufferers are as high as 1 in 10 in America, and 1 in 6 women. It’s also often misdiagnosed as a tension or sinus headache, and as such, mistreated.

    The difference between sinus and tension, and migraine headaches is that migraines can be SO severe that they send people to the emergency room. The throbbing, consistent pain can be moderate to severe, and will make everyday tasks very difficult.

    If you suffer from intense migraines often, peripheral nerve surgery may be a way to help you find relief. Many migraines are caused by nerve impingement in the neck. This is similar to the commonly treated carpal tunnel syndrome, where the nerve is pinched, causing pain in the wrist.

    Peripheral nerve surgery for migraines is a similar process.

    The surgery relieves the pressure on the nerve by removing the offending tissue from the area, allowing normal nerve function and relieving the headache symptoms.

    When no other underlying diseases or conditions are found, you may be a candidate for a nerve decompression surgery that can reduce or end your migraine headaches.  This is an outpatient surgery with short recovery times. Results are often immediately evident but may take several weeks. Neuropax surgeons can assess if nerve decompression surgery would help to alleviate or significantly reduce your debilitating symptoms.

    So call us today at 314-434-7784 to make an appointment to talk to Dr. Robert Hagan at Neuropax Clinic, and learn more about peripheral nerve surgery and migraine relief at www.neuropaxclinic.com now. Don’t live with a migraine if you don’t have to.

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    Get Migraine Surgery in St Charles at Neuropax Clinic

    Get Migraine Surgery in St Charles at Neuropax Clinic

    Migraine headaches, real, chronic migraines, can ruin your life. That’s not hyperbole, it’s the truth. When you get migraines regularly, you know that they can cause you to miss work, school, or social events. You can end up curled up in bed for the day, in excruciating pain. Migraine headaches are a scourge on those that suffer from them. But what if there was a way to relieve these nightmares?

    Nerve compression surgery can help. It is estimated that up to 13 % (likely even higher) of all chronic headaches are related to occipital nerve neuralgia. Neuralgia is a general term for pain or irritation along the course of a nerve. We are addressing the irritation caused by nerve compression in this situation. Surgery by Dr. Robert Hagan of the Neuropax Clinic can help relieve the symptoms and causes of severe headaches, allowing the recipient to suffer far reduced migraines, or possibly end the headaches altogether.

    Although the Greater occipital nerve is the most common nerve involved, other nerves can be involved as well. The lesser occipital nerve and dorsal (or least) occipital nerve which are located in the back of the head/scalp. Headaches may originate from the forehead or frontal region as well. The nerves involved in this area include the supra-orbital and zygomatico-temporal nerves.

    When no other underlying diseases or conditions are found, you may be a candidate for a nerve decompression surgery that can reduce or end your migraine headaches.  This is an outpatient surgery with short recovery times. Results are often immediately evident but may take several weeks. Neuropax surgeons can assess if nerve decompression surgery would help to alleviate or significantly reduce your debilitating symptoms.

    If you have persistent signs and symptoms suggestive of migraine pain, especially if they interfere with your normal activities and sleep patterns, see your doctor. If you leave the condition untreated, they'll only get worse.  For more information or to make an appointment with Neuropax Clinic, call us at 314-434-7784 or visit www.neuropaxclinic.com today to learn more.  Don't live with Migraine Pain any longer than you have to.

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    Ease Diabetic Neuropathy in St Louis

    Ease Diabetic Neuropathy in St Louis

    Peripheral neuropathy is the most common form of diabetic neuropathy. Your feet and legs are often affected first, followed by your hands and arms. Signs and symptoms of peripheral neuropathy are often worse at night, and may include:

    • Numbness or reduced ability to feel pain or temperature changes
    • A tingling or burning sensation
    • Sharp pains or cramps
    • Increased sensitivity to touch — for some people, even the weight of a bed sheet can be agonizing
    • Muscle weakness
    • Loss of reflexes, especially in the ankle
    • Loss of balance and coordination
    • Serious foot problems, such as ulcers, infections, deformities, and bone and joint pain

    Seek medical care if you notice:

    • A cut or sore on your foot that doesn't seem to be healing, is infected or is getting worse
    • Burning, tingling, weakness or pain in your hands or feet that interferes with your daily routine or your sleep
    • Dizziness
    • Changes in your digestion, urination or sexual function

    Diabetic neuropathy can cause a number of serious complications, including:

    • Loss of a limb. Because nerve damage can cause a lack of feeling in your feet, cuts and sores may go unnoticed and eventually become severely infected or ulcerated — a condition in which the skin and soft tissues break down. The risk of infection is high because diabetes reduces blood flow to your feet. Infections that spread to the bone and cause tissue death (gangrene) may be impossible to treat and require amputation of a toe, foot or even the lower leg.
    • Charcot joint. This occurs when a joint, usually in the foot, deteriorates because of nerve damage. Charcot joint is marked by loss of sensation, as well as swelling, instability and sometimes deformity in the joint itself. Early treatment can promote healing and prevent further damage.
    • Urinary tract infections and urinary incontinence. Damage to the nerves that control your bladder can prevent it from emptying completely. This allows bacteria to multiply in your bladder and kidneys, leading to urinary tract infections. Nerve damage can also affect your ability to feel when you need to urinate or to control the muscles that release urine.
    • Hypoglycemia unawareness. Normally, when your blood sugar drops too low — below 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL), or 3.9 millimoles per liter (mmol/L) — you develop symptoms such as shakiness, sweating and a fast heartbeat. Autonomic neuropathy can interfere with your ability to notice these symptoms.
    • Low blood pressure. Damage to the nerves that control circulation can affect your body's ability to adjust blood pressure. This can cause a sharp drop in pressure when you stand after sitting (orthostatic hypotension), which may lead to dizziness and fainting.
    • Digestive problems. Nerve damage in the digestive system can cause constipation or diarrhea — or alternating bouts of constipation and diarrhea — as well as nausea, vomiting, bloating and loss of appetite. It can also cause gastroparesis, a condition in which the stomach empties too slowly or not at all. This can interfere with digestion and cause nausea, vomiting and bloating, and severely affect blood sugar levels and nutrition.
    • Sexual dysfunction. Autonomic neuropathy often damages the nerves that affect the sex organs, leading to erectile dysfunction in men and problems with lubrication and arousal in women.
    • Increased or decreased sweating. When the sweat glands don't function normally, your body isn't able to regulate its temperature properly. A reduced or complete lack of perspiration (anhidrosis) can be life-threatening. Autonomic neuropathy may also cause excessive sweating, particularly at night or while eating.

    Diabetic neuropathy has been considered an irreversible disorder with traditional treatments focused on preventing the progression of the condition; or reducing the pain symptoms with drugs or specialized footwear.  However, treatment with nerve decompression surgery to address the symptoms of diabetic peripheral neuropathy now have an established clinical track record.  Many clinical studies have been published reporting the value of nerve decompression surgery in the treatment of peripheral diabetic neuropathy.

    Goals of the surgery are to restore sensation to the hands or feet, reduce or eliminate pain and to regain strength. If sensation is restored to the feet, the risk of having an ulceration or infection leading to an amputation is nearly eliminated.  Many patients are able to discontinue their medications relating to neuropathy after this procedure. 

    If you suffer from diabetic neuropathy, physicians from Neuropax Clinic can determine whether surgery might be appropriate for you. A comprehensive evaluation will be performed to determine whether you have compressed nerves that may respond to surgery. We have already helped many patients regain sensation and get relief from pain with this surgical approach.

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    Migraine Surgery Available in St. Louis

    Migraine Surgery Available in St. Louis

    Migraine headaches, real, chronic migraines, can ruin your life. That’s not hyperbole, it’s the truth. When you get migraines regularly, you know that they can cause you to miss work, school, or social events. You can end up curled up in bed for the day, in excruciating pain. Migraine headaches are a scourge on those that suffer from them. But what if there was a way to relieve these nightmares?

    Nerve compression surgery can help. It is estimated that up to 13 % (likely even higher) of all chronic headaches are related to occipital nerve neuralgia. Neuralgia is a general term for pain or irritation along the course of a nerve. We are addressing the irritation caused by nerve compression in this situation. Surgery by Dr. Robert Hagan of the Neuropax Clinic can help relieve the symptoms and causes of severe headaches, allowing the recipient to suffer far reduced migraines, or possibly end the headaches altogether.

    Although the Greater occipital nerve is the most common nerve involved, other nerves can be involved as well. The lesser occipital nerve and dorsal (or least) occipital nerve which are located in the back of the head/scalp. Headaches may originate from the forehead or frontal region as well. The nerves involved in this area include the supra-orbital and zygomatico-temporal nerves.

    When no other underlying diseases or conditions are found, you may be a candidate for a nerve decompression surgery that can reduce or end your migraine headaches.  This is an outpatient surgery with short recovery times. Results are often immediately evident but may take several weeks. Neuropax surgeons can assess if nerve decompression surgery would help to alleviate or significantly reduce your debilitating symptoms.

    If you have persistent signs and symptoms suggestive of migraine pain, especially if they interfere with your normal activities and sleep patterns, see your doctor. If you leave the condition untreated, they'll only get worse.  For more information or to make an appointment with Neuropax Clinic, call us at 314-434-7784 or visit www.neuropaxclinic.com today to learn more.  Don't live with Migraine Pain any longer than you have to.

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    Elbow Pain? Could Be Cubital Tunnel Syndrome

    Elbow Pain? Could Be Cubital Tunnel Syndrome

    Cubital Tunnel Syndrome

    What is Cubital Tunnel Syndrome?

    Cubital tunnel syndrome is a condition brought on by increased pressure on the ulnar nerve at the elbow. There is a bump of bone on the inner portion of the elbow (medial epicondyle) under which the ulnar nerve passes. This site is commonly called the “funny bone” (see Figure 1). At this site, the ulnar nerve lies directly next to the bone and is susceptible to pressure. When the pressure on the nerve becomes great enough to disturb the way the nerve works, then numbness, tingling, and pain may be felt in the elbow, forearm, hand, and/or fingers.

    What causes Cubital Tunnel Syndrome?

    Pressure on the ulnar nerve at the elbow can develop in several ways. The nerve is positioned right next to the bone and has very little padding over it, so pressure on this can put pressure on the nerve. For example, if you lean your arm against a table on the inner part of the elbow, your arm may fall asleep and be painful from sustained pressure on the ulnar nerve. If this occurs repetitively, the numbness and pain may be more persistent. In some patients, the ulnar nerve at the elbow clicks back and forth over the bony bump (medial epicondyle) as the elbow is bent and straightened. If this occurs repetitively, the nerve may be significantly irritated.

    Additionally, pressure on the ulnar nerve can occur from holding the elbow in a bent position for a long time, which stretches the nerve across the medial epicondyle. Such sustained bending of the elbow may tend to occur during sleep. Sometimes the connective tissue over the nerve becomes thicker, or there may be variations of the muscle structure over the nerve at the elbow that cause pressure on the nerve. Cubital tunnel syndrome occurs when the pressure on the nerve is significant enough, and sustained enough, to disturb the way the ulnar nerve works.

    Signs and symptoms of Cubital Tunnel Syndrome
    Cubital tunnel syndrome symptoms usually include pain, numbness, and/or tingling. The numbness or tingling most often occurs in the ring and little fingers. The symptoms are usually felt when there is pressure on the nerve, such as sitting with the elbow on an arm rest, or with repetitive elbow bending and straightening. Often symptoms will be felt when the elbow is held in a bent position for a period of time, such as when holding the phone, or while sleeping. Some patients may notice weakness while pinching, occasional clumsiness, and/or a tendency to drop things. In severe cases, sensation may be lost and the muscles in the hand may lose bulk and strength.

    Diagnosis of Cubital Tunnel Syndrome
    Your physician will assess the pattern and distribution of your symptoms, and examine for muscle weakness, irritability of the nerve to tapping and/or bending of the elbow, and changes in sensation. Other medical conditions may need to be evaluated such as thyroid disease or diabetes. A test called electromyography (EMG) and/or nerve conduction study (NCS) may be done to confirm the diagnosis of cubital tunnel syndrome and stage its severity. This test also checks for other possible nerve problems, such as a pinched nerve in the neck, which may cause similar symptoms.

    Treatment of Cubital Tunnel Syndrome
    Symptoms may sometimes be relieved without surgery, particularly if the EMG/NCS testing shows that the pressure on the nerve is minimal. Changing the patterns of elbow use may significantly reduce the pressure on the nerve. Avoiding putting your elbow on hard surfaces may help, or wearing an elbow pad over the ulnar nerve and “funny bone” may help. Keeping the elbow straight at night with a splint also may help. A session with a therapist to learn ways to avoid pressure on the nerve may be needed.

    When symptoms are severe or do not improve, surgery may be needed to relieve the pressure on the nerve. Many surgeons will recommend shifting the nerve to the front of the elbow, which relieves pressure and tension on the nerve. The nerve may be placed under a layer of fat, under the muscle, or within the muscle. Some surgeons may recommend trimming the bony bump (medial epicondyle). Following surgery, the recovery will depend on the type of surgery that was performed. Restrictions on lifting and/or elbow movement may be recommended. Therapy may be necessary. The numbness and tingling may improve quickly or slowly, and it may take several months for the strength in the hand and wrist to improve. Cubital tunnel symptoms may not completely resolve after surgery, especially in severe cases.

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    If You Have Wrist Pain, It May Be Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    If You Have Wrist Pain It Could Be Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    Carpal Tunnel Release Surgery, or Carpal Tunnel Surgery, is a procedure designed to release the pressure or impingement on the median nerve, relieving the symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome. This syndrome is expressed by pain and numbness in the hand and wrist, and is often caused by repetitive stress and holding the hand/wrist in an awkward position. People who type often, use a hammer, or work in a factory setting are all candidates for this syndrome.

    During the surgery, an incision on the base of the hand is made, letting us examine the transverse carpal ligament. We are then able to clean up the area, suture the wound, and you are usually released that day. Carpal tunnel surgery is not typically an overnight hospital stay and is usually done under local anesthesia. It’s a one-day procedure and you should sleep in your own bed that night.

    After the procedure, you need to keep the hand wrapped for 10-14 days, until the stitches are removed. The pain and numbness may go away right away, or may linger for a few months. You really should take it easy with the wrist for at least 3 months. If it’s your dominant hand, you want to give it a little longer to rest before returning to work. Non-dominant hand surgery patients can usually return to non-physical labor in a day or two, but if it’s your dominant hand or you have a very physical job, you may need physical therapy and more rest than that.

    The surgery is generally recommended after nonsurgical treatment has failed. Braces and anti-inflammatory medicines can help the situation, along with rest, but surgery is the last step. This also assumes that there is no nerve damage. Nerve damage patients should have surgery more quickly to avoid the situation becoming worse.

    If you feel that you are suffering from carpal tunnel syndrome and you are ready to do something about it, Neuropax Clinic and Dr. Robert Hagan are ready to help. If you suffer from numbness or pain in your wrist or hand, call us at 314-434-7784 to schedule an appointment or visit www.neuropaxclinic.com for more information. Don’t live with wrist pain any longer than you have to.

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    Migraine Surgery Can Cure Your Headaches

    Migraine Surgery Can Cure Your Headaches

    Migraines are a scourge. They can ruin your entire life if untreated. A migraine can leave you lying in a dark room or home early from work. Nerve compression surgery for migraines can help.

    There are 180 different defined types of headaches. Headaches are common in the US, with a variety of different causes. Chronic, daily or even continual headaches can be from migraines. There are over 30 million people believed to be suffering from migraines today. While some can be treated with medication and therapy, some require surgery.

    13% or more of migraines are thought to be related to occipital neuralgia. When the Greater occipital nerve is impinged, with tissue causing pressure on the nerve, the symptoms begin. If they remain untreated, it leads to migraine headaches.

    Although the Greater occipital nerve is the most common nerve involved, other nerves can be involved as well. The lesser occipital nerve and dorsal (or least) occipital nerve which are located in the back of the head/scalp. Headaches may originate from the forehead or frontal region as well. The nerves involved in this area include the supra-orbital and zygomatico-temporal nerves.

    When no other underlying diseases or conditions are found, you may be a candidate for a nerve decompression surgery that can reduce or end your migraine headaches.  This is an outpatient surgery with short recovery times. Results are often immediately evident but may take several weeks. Neuropax surgeons can assess if nerve decompression surgery would help to alleviate or significantly reduce your debilitating symptoms.

    If you feel that you may be suffering from migraines, please call the office at Neuropax Clinic at 314-434-7784 to make an appointment. Don’t live in pain another day if you don’t have to. Visit www.neuropaxclinic.com for more information.

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    Do You Need Migraine Surgery?

    Do You Need Migraine Surgery

    If you get severe headaches often, you may be suffering from migraines. Migraines are headaches with throbbing pain, usually described as worse on one side of your head or the other. Often debilitating, the migraine can stop you from fulfilling your daily activities and responsibilities. They can also last anywhere from hours to days. Migraine sufferers are as high as 1 in 10 in America, and 1 in 6 women. It’s also often misdiagnosed as a tension or sinus headache, and as such, mistreated.

    The difference between sinus and tension, and migraine headaches is that migraines can be SO severe that they send people to the emergency room. The throbbing, consistent pain can be moderate to severe, and will make everyday tasks very difficult.

    If you suffer from intense migraines often, peripheral nerve surgery may be a way to help you find relief. Many migraines are caused by nerve impingement in the neck. This is similar to the commonly treated carpal tunnel syndrome, where the nerve is pinched, causing pain in the wrist.

    Peripheral nerve surgery for migraines is a similar process.

    The surgery relieves the pressure on the nerve by removing the offending tissue from the area, allowing normal nerve function and relieving the headache symptoms.

    When no other underlying diseases or conditions are found, you may be a candidate for a nerve decompression surgery that can reduce or end your migraine headaches.  This is an outpatient surgery with short recovery times. Results are often immediately evident but may take several weeks. Neuropax surgeons can assess if nerve decompression surgery would help to alleviate or significantly reduce your debilitating symptoms.

    So call us today at 314-434-7784 to make an appointment to talk to Dr. Robert Hagan at Neuropax Clinic, and learn more about peripheral nerve surgery and migraine relief at www.neuropaxclinic.com now. Don’t live with a migraine if you don’t have to.

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    Are Migraines Ruining Your Life?

    Are Migraines Ruining Your Life

    They probably are if you’re reading this.

    Right now, there are 180 different kinds of headaches defined. Almost everyone gets headaches from time to time. If they are chronic, daily or even continual, you may be suffering from migraines. There are at least 30 million US citizens currently suffering from some kind of chronic migraines. Some of these are responsive to medicine, and some are debilitating and med resistant.

    At least 13% of migraines are believed to be caused by occipital neuralgia. This is a symptom where the Greater occipital nerve is impinged, with tissue causing pressure on the nerve. If untreated, it leads to migraine headaches.

    Although the Greater occipital nerve is the most common nerve involved, other nerves can be involved as well. The lesser occipital nerve and dorsal (or least) occipital nerve which are located in the back of the head/scalp. Headaches may originate from the forehead or frontal region as well. The nerves involved in this area include the supra-orbital and zygomatico-temporal nerves.

    When no other underlying diseases or conditions are found, you may be a candidate for a nerve decompression surgery that can reduce or end your migraine headaches.  This is an outpatient surgery with short recovery times. Results are often immediately evident but may take several weeks. Neuropax surgeons can assess if nerve decompression surgery would help to alleviate or significantly reduce your debilitating symptoms.

    If you feel that you may be suffering from migraines, please call the office at Neuropax Clinic at 314-434-7784 to make an appointment. Don’t live in pain another day if you don’t have to. Visit www.neuropaxclinic.com for more information.

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    Relieve Hand and Wrist Pain From Carpal Tunnel

    Carpal Tunnel Surgery St Louis

    Carpal Tunnel Release Surgery, or Carpal Tunnel Surgery, is a procedure designed to release the pressure or impingement on the median nerve, relieving the symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome. This syndrome is expressed by pain and numbness in the hand and wrist, and is often caused by repetitive stress and holding the hand/wrist in an awkward position. People who type often, use a hammer, or work in a factory setting are all candidates for this syndrome.

    During the surgery, an incision on the base of the hand is made, letting us examine the transverse carpal ligament. We are then able to clean up the area, suture the wound, and you are usually released that day. Carpal tunnel surgery is not typically an overnight hospital stay and is usually done under local anesthesia. It’s a one-day procedure and you should sleep in your own bed that night.

    After the procedure, you need to keep the hand wrapped for 10-14 days, until the stitches are removed. The pain and numbness may go away right away, or may linger for a few months. You really should take it easy with the wrist for at least 3 months. If it’s your dominant hand, you want to give it a little longer to rest before returning to work. Non-dominant hand surgery patients can usually return to non-physical labor in a day or two, but if it’s your dominant hand or you have a very physical job, you may need physical therapy and more rest than that.

    The surgery is generally recommended after nonsurgical treatment has failed. Braces and anti-inflammatory medicines can help the situation, along with rest, but surgery is the last step. This also assumes that there is no nerve damage. Nerve damage patients should have surgery more quickly to avoid the situation becoming worse.

    If you feel that you are suffering from carpal tunnel syndrome and you are ready to do something about it, Neuropax Clinic and Dr. Robert Hagan are ready to help. If you suffer from numbness or pain in your wrist or hand, call us at 314-434-7784 to schedule an appointment or visit www.neuropaxclinic.com for more information. Don’t live with wrist pain any longer than you have to.

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    Why Migraine Surgery Can Help

    Migraine Surgery St Louis

    Migraine headaches, real, chronic migraines, can ruin your life. That’s not hyperbole, it’s the truth. When you get migraines regularly, you know that they can cause you to miss work, school, or social events. You can end up curled up in bed for the day, in excruciating pain. Migraine headaches are a scourge on those that suffer from them. But what if there was a way to relieve these nightmares?

    Nerve compression surgery can help. It is estimated that up to 13 % (likely even higher) of all chronic headaches are related to occipital nerve neuralgia. Neuralgia is a general term for pain or irritation along the course of a nerve. We are addressing the irritation caused by nerve compression in this situation. Surgery by Dr. Robert Hagan of the Neuropax Clinic can help relieve the symptoms and causes of severe headaches, allowing the recipient to suffer far reduced migraines, or possibly end the headaches altogether.

    Although the Greater occipital nerve is the most common nerve involved, other nerves can be involved as well. The lesser occipital nerve and dorsal (or least) occipital nerve which are located in the back of the head/scalp. Headaches may originate from the forehead or frontal region as well. The nerves involved in this area include the supra-orbital and zygomatico-temporal nerves.

    When no other underlying diseases or conditions are found, you may be a candidate for a nerve decompression surgery that can reduce or end your migraine headaches.  This is an outpatient surgery with short recovery times. Results are often immediately evident but may take several weeks. Neuropax surgeons can assess if nerve decompression surgery would help to alleviate or significantly reduce your debilitating symptoms.

    If you have persistent signs and symptoms suggestive of migraine pain, especially if they interfere with your normal activities and sleep patterns, see your doctor. If you leave the condition untreated, they'll only get worse.  For more information or to make an appointment with Neuropax Clinic, call us at 314-434-7784 or visit www.neuropaxclinic.com today to learn more.  Don't live with Migraine Pain any longer than you have to.

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    Carpal Tunnel of the Hip or Meralgia Paresthetica

    Meralgia Paresthetica is a constellation of symptoms caused by a compression neuropathy (pinched nerve) of the Lateral Femoral Nerve (LFN).  The LFN arises from the second and third lumbar spinal levels (L2,L3). As the LFN travels from the spine to the thigh region, the nerve can be pinched at the anterior pelvic tunnel. This tunnel is made by the bone of anterior superior iliac spine, the dense fibers of the inguinal ligament and overlaying musculature.  Pressure on this nerve causes feelings of burning, pain and numbness along the front and lateral part of the thigh, extending all the way from anterior and lateral hip, groin and gluteal area to the knee. In some, there can even be very deep groin and testicular or labial pain.

    It is not uncommon for the severity of symptoms to be significantly debilitating, especially if the problem is not addressed. It is important to understand that this a very treatable problem. Its like having carpal tunnel of your hip. Early or old teachings that suggest there is nothing to do, still permeate the medical community regarding this problem.

    This compression neuropathy (pinched nerve condition) can be caused by several different mechanisms. Anatomical studies have shown that at least 5% of the population has an abnormal nerve tunnel. This anatomic variant is highly vulnerable for compression but any nerve can become compressed or damaged. History of pelvic fracture, Blunt trauma in or near the nerve and tunnel, can cause direct trauma to the nerve or trauma to the surrounding tissues that leads to compression of the nerve as well.  

    Even just having surgery in the area of the hip, groin or abdomen can lead to changes in the tissue surrounding the nerve and lead to compression. Prior hip surgery, hernia surgery, bone graft harvest, cesarean sections are some of the most common.

    Some professional activities (i.e. police officers, firefighters and construction workers, etc.) require wearing heavy and loaded belts around the waist. This exposes the nerve to excess and repetitive pressure, especially if anatomical nerve path abnormalities already exist. Various sports like karate/kickboxing, football, soccer, rugby and others can all produce injuries that result in this problem.  Body habitus such as abdominal obesity or pregnancies can also contribute to repetitive stress and stretching of the nerve.

    It is also important to recognize the affects of diabetes on this clinical problem. Diabetic patients, due to abnormal glucose metabolism, may develop swelling of the nerve, as well as narrowing of the tunnel itself. This alters the normally perfect relationship between the nerve and its tunnel, making it now too narrow for the more swollen nerve, resulting in lateral femoral cutaneous nerve neuropathy. Therefore, diabetic patients are at much higher risk for experiencing symptoms of Meralgia Paresthetica than the general population.

    Once you have been identified to have symptoms consistent with Meralgia Paresthetica or compression of the Lateral Femoral Nerve (LFN) several diagnostic points should be addressed. In some cases, lower spine or lumbar spine pathology should be ruled out with an MRI. This study can also include a study of the pelvis to rule out any mass or tumor causing compression to the nerve along its course. Ultrasound guided, site specific, diagnostic injections are routinely utilized for confirming the diagnosis. In some cases, the addition of steroid to this injection can provide symptomatic relief for some variable length of time. If there is no spinal or pelvic pathology and the severity of symptoms are not too severe, conservative care is a very appropriate initial treatment. This may include: nerve modulator medicines (i.e. neurontin, amitriptyline, etc. ), topical compound cream, lifestyle changes, weight loss and physical therapy. If conservative therapies have been tried and fail after 3 months, surgical decompression should be considered. Accessory treatment modalities such as radio frequency ablation(RFA), sclerosing or spinal cord stimulators do not treat the problem and should not be utilized for this clinical problem.

    Surgical decompression of the nerve is successful in 80-85% of cases. In the residual population that fail decompression, 80% of these patients will respond to going back and resecting (neurectomy) the nerve.

    The success of the surgery depends on how long the nerve has been compressed, the severity of the compression, the extent of nerve damage due to injury and the possible presence of underlying medical or spine problems.

    The surgery performed in an outpatient setting. The surgical incision is generally very small, however body habitus can dictate a larger incision. The post-operative course is consistent but is affected by the amount of decompression required. In general, people can return to light duty work after 2 to 3 weeks and unlimited/unrestricted activity at 6 weeks.

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    What Is Carpal Tunnel Syndrome?

    What is carpal tunnel syndrome

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a condition brought on by increased pressure on the median nerve at the wrist. In effect, it is a pinched nerve at the wrist. Symptoms may include numbness, tingling, and pain in the arm, hand, and fingers. There is a space in the wrist called the carpal tunnel where the median nerve and nine tendons pass from the forearm into the hand (see Figure 1). Carpal tunnel syndrome happens when pressure builds up from swelling in this tunnel and puts pressure on the nerve. When the pressure from the swelling becomes great enough to disturb the way the nerve works, numbness, tingling, and pain may be felt in the hand and fingers (see Figure 2).

    What causes carpal tunnel syndrome?

    Usually the cause is unknown. Pressure on the nerve can happen several ways: swelling of the lining of the flexor tendons, called tenosynovitis; joint dislocations, fractures, and arthritis can narrow the tunnel; and keeping the wrist bent for long periods of time. Fluid retention during pregnancy can cause swelling in the tunnel and symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome, which often go away after delivery. Thyroid conditions, rheumatoid arthritis, and diabetes also can be associated with carpal tunnel syndrome. There may be a combination of causes.

    Signs and symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome

    Carpal tunnel syndrome symptoms usually include pain, numbness, tingling, or a combination of the three. The numbness or tingling most often takes place in the thumb, index, middle, and ring fingers. The symptoms usually are felt during the night but also may be noticed during daily activities such as driving or reading a newspaper. Patients may sometimes notice a weaker grip, occasional clumsiness, and a tendency to drop things. In severe cases, sensation may be permanently lost and the muscles at the base of the thumb slowly shrink (thenar atrophy), causing difficulty with pinch.

    ( Although carpal tunnel is commonly found as an isolated condition, it can frequently co-exist with other compressed or pinched nerves. These can be in the wrist arm or neck regions.  For example, if you have numbness in the small finger as well, the Ulnar nerve needs to be checked.  Nerves are like long wires coming off the spine and can be pinched at more than one site along their path. Comprehensive evaluation by a peripheral nerve surgeon is ideal for these conditions.  See section on peripheral nerve decompression)

    Diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome

    A detailed history including medical conditions, how the hands have been used, and whether there were any prior injuries is important. An x-ray may be taken to check for the other causes of the complaints such as arthritis or a fracture. In some cases, laboratory tests may be done if there is a suspected medical condition that is associated with CTS. Electrodiagnostic studies (NCV–nerve conduction velocities and EMG–electromyogram) may be done to confirm the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome as well as to check for other possible nerve problems.

    ( It is very important to understand that the electrodiagnostic studies are not always needed to confirm the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome.  This is a diagnostic study that should be utilized only if necessary.  Further, like other diagnostic tests it has it own rate of false negative and false positive results. The whole clinical picture should be considered in diagnosing nerve compression syndromes, "pinched nerves", like carpal tunnel) 

    Treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome

    Symptoms may often be relieved without surgery. Identifying and treating medical conditions, changing the patterns of hand use, or keeping the wrist splinted in a straight position may help reduce pressure on the nerve. Wearing wrist splints at night may relieve the symptoms that interfere with sleep. A steroid injection into the carpal tunnel may help relieve the symptoms by reducing swelling around the nerve.

    When symptoms are severe or do not improve, surgery may be needed to make more room for the nerve. Pressure on the nerve is decreased by cutting the ligament that forms the roof (top) of the tunnel on the palm side of the hand (see Figure 3). Incisions for this surgery may vary, but the goal is the same: to enlarge the tunnel and decrease pressure on the nerve.

    Following surgery, soreness around the incision may last for several weeks or months. The numbness and tingling may disappear quickly or slowly. It may take several months for strength in the hand and wrist to return to normal. Carpal tunnel symptoms may not completely go away after surgery, especially in severe cases.

    Figure 1:  The carpal tunnel is found at the base of the palm. It is formed by the bones of the wrist and the transverse carpal ligament. Increased pressure in the tunnel affects the function of the median nerve.

    Figure 2:  Aspects of median nerve function.

    Figure 3:  The goal of surgery is to free the ligament to allow more room for the median nerve in the carpal tunnel.


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    Don't Be Scared To Talk About Diabetic Neuropathy

    Don't Be Scared to Talk About Diabetic Neuropathy

    Peripheral neuropathy is the most common form of diabetic neuropathy. Your feet and legs are often affected first, followed by your hands and arms. Signs and symptoms of peripheral neuropathy are often worse at night, and may include:

    • Numbness or reduced ability to feel pain or temperature changes
    • A tingling or burning sensation
    • Sharp pains or cramps
    • Increased sensitivity to touch — for some people, even the weight of a bed sheet can be agonizing
    • Muscle weakness
    • Loss of reflexes, especially in the ankle
    • Loss of balance and coordination
    • Serious foot problems, such as ulcers, infections, deformities, and bone and joint pain

    Seek medical care if you notice:

    • A cut or sore on your foot that doesn't seem to be healing, is infected or is getting worse
    • Burning, tingling, weakness or pain in your hands or feet that interferes with your daily routine or your sleep
    • Dizziness
    • Changes in your digestion, urination or sexual function

    Diabetic neuropathy can cause a number of serious complications, including:

    • Loss of a limb. Because nerve damage can cause a lack of feeling in your feet, cuts and sores may go unnoticed and eventually become severely infected or ulcerated — a condition in which the skin and soft tissues break down. The risk of infection is high because diabetes reduces blood flow to your feet. Infections that spread to the bone and cause tissue death (gangrene) may be impossible to treat and require amputation of a toe, foot or even the lower leg.
    • Charcot joint. This occurs when a joint, usually in the foot, deteriorates because of nerve damage. Charcot joint is marked by loss of sensation, as well as swelling, instability and sometimes deformity in the joint itself. Early treatment can promote healing and prevent further damage.
    • Urinary tract infections and urinary incontinence. Damage to the nerves that control your bladder can prevent it from emptying completely. This allows bacteria to multiply in your bladder and kidneys, leading to urinary tract infections. Nerve damage can also affect your ability to feel when you need to urinate or to control the muscles that release urine.
    • Hypoglycemia unawareness. Normally, when your blood sugar drops too low — below 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL), or 3.9 millimoles per liter (mmol/L) — you develop symptoms such as shakiness, sweating and a fast heartbeat. Autonomic neuropathy can interfere with your ability to notice these symptoms.
    • Low blood pressure. Damage to the nerves that control circulation can affect your body's ability to adjust blood pressure. This can cause a sharp drop in pressure when you stand after sitting (orthostatic hypotension), which may lead to dizziness and fainting.
    • Digestive problems. Nerve damage in the digestive system can cause constipation or diarrhea — or alternating bouts of constipation and diarrhea — as well as nausea, vomiting, bloating and loss of appetite. It can also cause gastroparesis, a condition in which the stomach empties too slowly or not at all. This can interfere with digestion and cause nausea, vomiting and bloating, and severely affect blood sugar levels and nutrition.
    • Sexual dysfunction. Autonomic neuropathy often damages the nerves that affect the sex organs, leading to erectile dysfunction in men and problems with lubrication and arousal in women.
    • Increased or decreased sweating. When the sweat glands don't function normally, your body isn't able to regulate its temperature properly. A reduced or complete lack of perspiration (anhidrosis) can be life-threatening. Autonomic neuropathy may also cause excessive sweating, particularly at night or while eating.

    Diabetic neuropathy has been considered an irreversible disorder with traditional treatments focused on preventing the progression of the condition; or reducing the pain symptoms with drugs or specialized footwear.  However, treatment with nerve decompression surgery to address the symptoms of diabetic peripheral neuropathy now have an established clinical track record.  Many clinical studies have been published reporting the value of nerve decompression surgery in the treatment of peripheral diabetic neuropathy.

    Goals of the surgery are to restore sensation to the hands or feet, reduce or eliminate pain and to regain strength. If sensation is restored to the feet, the risk of having an ulceration or infection leading to an amputation is nearly eliminated.  Many patients are able to discontinue their medications relating to neuropathy after this procedure. 

    If you suffer from diabetic neuropathy, physicians from Neuropax Clinic can determine whether surgery might be appropriate for you. A comprehensive evaluation will be performed to determine whether you have compressed nerves that may respond to surgery. We have already helped many patients regain sensation and get relief from pain with this surgical approach.

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    Migraine Relief and Migraine Surgery in Kansas City

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    Migraine headaches, real, chronic migraines, can ruin your life. That’s not hyperbole, it’s the truth. When you get migraines regularly, you know that they can cause you to miss work, school, or social events. You can end up curled up in bed for the day, in excruciating pain. Migraine headaches are a scourge on those that suffer from them. But what if there was a way to relieve these nightmares?

    Nerve compression surgery can help. It is estimated that up to 13 % (likely even higher) of all chronic headaches are related to occipital nerve neuralgia. Neuralgia is a general term for pain or irritation along the course of a nerve. We are addressing the irritation caused by nerve compression in this situation. Surgery by Dr. Robert Hagan of the Neuropax Clinic can help relieve the symptoms and causes of severe headaches, allowing the recipient to suffer far reduced migraines, or possibly end the headaches altogether.

    Although the Greater occipital nerve is the most common nerve involved, other nerves can be involved as well. The lesser occipital nerve and dorsal (or least) occipital nerve which are located in the back of the head/scalp. Headaches may originate from the forehead or frontal region as well. The nerves involved in this area include the supra-orbital and zygomatico-temporal nerves.

    When no other underlying diseases or conditions are found, you may be a candidate for a nerve decompression surgery that can reduce or end your migraine headaches.  This is an outpatient surgery with short recovery times. Results are often immediately evident but may take several weeks. Neuropax surgeons can assess if nerve decompression surgery would help to alleviate or significantly reduce your debilitating symptoms.

    If you have persistent signs and symptoms suggestive of migraine pain, especially if they interfere with your normal activities and sleep patterns, see your doctor. If you leave the condition untreated, they'll only get worse.  For more information or to make an appointment with Neuropax Clinic, call us at 314-434-7784 or visit www.neuropaxclinic.com today to learn more.  Don't live with Migraine Pain any longer than you have to.

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    Relieve Carpal Tunnel Surgery Pain in St. Louis

    Relieve Carpal Tunnel Surgery Pain In St. Louis

    Carpal Tunnel Release Surgery, or Carpal Tunnel Surgery, is a procedure designed to release the pressure or impingement on the median nerve, relieving the symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome. This syndrome is expressed by pain and numbness in the hand and wrist, and is often caused by repetitive stress and holding the hand/wrist in an awkward position. People who type often, use a hammer, or work in a factory setting are all candidates for this syndrome.

    During the surgery, an incision on the base of the hand is made, letting us examine the transverse carpal ligament. We are then able to clean up the area, suture the wound, and you are usually released that day. Carpal tunnel surgery is not typically an overnight hospital stay and is usually done under local anesthesia. It’s a one-day procedure and you should sleep in your own bed that night.

    After the procedure, you need to keep the hand wrapped for 10-14 days, until the stitches are removed. The pain and numbness may go away right away, or may linger for a few months. You really should take it easy with the wrist for at least 3 months. If it’s your dominant hand, you want to give it a little longer to rest before returning to work. Non-dominant hand surgery patients can usually return to non-physical labor in a day or two, but if it’s your dominant hand or you have a very physical job, you may need physical therapy and more rest than that.

    The surgery is generally recommended after nonsurgical treatment has failed. Braces and anti-inflammatory medicines can help the situation, along with rest, but surgery is the last step. This also assumes that there is no nerve damage. Nerve damage patients should have surgery more quickly to avoid the situation becoming worse.

    If you feel that you are suffering from carpal tunnel syndrome and you are ready to do something about it, Neuropax Clinic and Dr. Robert Hagan are ready to help. If you suffer from numbness or pain in your wrist or hand, call us at 314-434-7784 to schedule an appointment or visit www.neuropaxclinic.com for more information. Don’t live with wrist pain any longer than you have to.

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    Migraine Surgery Signs in St. Louis

    Migraine Surgery Signs in St. Louis

    Migraines are debilitating headaches that strike without warning and can ruin your life. They often occur with no buildup. Not every headache is a migraine, though. There are very specific signs that what you are experiencing is a migraine.

    They occur in various combinations and include:

    • Moderate to severe pain (often described as pounding, throbbing pain) that can affect the whole head, or can shift from one side of the head to the other
    • Sensitivity to light, noise or odors
    • Blurred vision
    • Nausea or vomiting, stomach upset, abdominal pain
    • Loss of appetite
    • Sensations of being very warm or cold
    • Paleness
    • Fatigue
    • Dizziness
    • Fever (rare)
    • Bright flashing dots or lights, blind spots, wavy or jagged lines (aura)

    It is estimated that up to 13 % (likely even higher) of all chronic headaches are related to occipital nerve neuralgia. Neuralgia is a general term for pain or irritation along the course of a nerve. We are addressing the irritation caused by nerve compression in this situation.

    Although the Greater occipital nerve is the most common nerve involved, other nerves can be involved as well. The lesser occipital nerve and dorsal (or least) occipital nerve which are located in the back of the head/scalp. Headaches may originate from the forehead or frontal region as well. The nerves involved in this area include the supra-orbital and zygomatico-temporal nerves.

    When no other underlying diseases or conditions are found, you may be a candidate for a nerve decompression surgery that can reduce or end your migraine headaches. This is an outpatient surgery with short recovery times. Results are often immediately evident but may take several weeks. Neuropax surgeons can assess if nerve decompression surgery would help to alleviate or significantly reduce your debilitating symptoms.

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